Sunday, 6 December 2009

A sincere form of flattery


It is often said that imitation is the most sincere form of flattery.

I have long admired the work done by our fellow CDPBr Phil over at The Daily Dublin Photo Blog and have followed and commented for quite some time. I am intruiged by two things: his subjects, and his style. His style is very understated and he eschews flourish, ornamentation and excess. His subjects are the grotty areas of his city: the run-down, the abandoned, the dejected. His is a wonderful eye in action.


Whilst ambling (okay, meandering) through The Rocks & Millers Point yesterday, I had a PJ moment. This area was the origins of convict settlement in my city. However, the run-down, the abandoned and the dejected have undergone gentrification (okay, urban renewal). And I am no PJ.

I want my eye to be able to see in its own way but keeping in mind the PJ principles. This is my first attempt at an occasional new style.

18 comments:

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

Interesting post and commentary. It should not be a surprise that a gritty old commercial building in Australia used to be in the wool business.

It is interesting to observe, admire, and in some cases be influenced by the styles of the Daily Photo photographers, as you discussed today. My wife and I are both Daily Photo bloggers. (She is Julie of Scottsdale Daily Photo. One of our best friends is Sharon who does Phoenix Daily Photo. When we are out, we can observe things and note similarities to what we might see on particular Daily Photo sites . For example, if there is an over-the-top stylish woman, we may comment that Jilly would have gotten a photo of her.

Dimple said...

Julie,
Thanks for your comment! I have just been scanning your latest posts; they are wonderful!

There is a particular kind of beauty in decay; I don't quite know how to say it, but I see it, and photograph it. Sometime I may do a post along that line...

On your other recent posts, the fountain is really different--it calls to mind a mushroom or an umbrella! And the pictures of the children waiting are precious and beautiful.

Dawn said...

I love Dimple saying that "there is a particular kind of beauty in decay." Personally, I think that dilapidated buildings and forgotten areas are some of the best places to photograph.

Of the photographs that you shared, my favorite is definitely the second one; the one with the door.

Lily Hydrangea said...

I love "old" things. There are so much more interesting to look at.

EcoRover said...

I love "ghost signs" like your old wool store and the stories they tell about a place. Some cities even have ordinances to protect them as historic artifacts.

Jacob said...

Well, I like it and I think you did a good job, and it's your own vision - you wouldn't want to copy someone else's work anyway! Right?

Hope you're having a great weekend!

Joan Elizabeth said...

Julie, I learn from you all the time!! I like the top shot best though any of them would work well in isolation. Took a look at the link ... the work there is fabulous. There is a very clear individual voice there. I'm still trying to find mine.

ρομπερτ said...

You were able to teach me a great lesson. Thank you for the wonderful writing and photography alike.
Please have a nice Sunday.

Ann said...

Interesting subject area. I like urban decay, particularly if its contrasted with the bright, shiny and modern.

Ann said...

PS. I remembered my jacket as your bus pulled out. Just means we'll have to have another drink.

Helena said...

These are great shots! I love old buildings ... they have so many interesting stories to tell if you look hard enough at them.

Thanks for visiting my blog. I really appreciate it.

Lena

Marka said...

The glimpses of reflection are actually that of a bird flying over a river.

wenn said...

ya..beauty in the old..

Vogon Poet said...

I like this new style and I'll have to check the original Dublin too. Just thinking about applying it to something here...

brattcat said...

I think one of the things I most love about your photography and comments, Julie, is your wide range of interests and styles. Never know what we're going to find here, but I'm always engaged by your posts. Your waiting post was one of the finest I've ever seen, your fountain was absolutely flawless in composition. And these gritty bricks with their long, dark history...Thank you for the journey you're taking, thank you for taking us with you.

Birdman said...

Enjoyed your commentary on this one. Always interested in why photographers shot what they do. Just what were you thinking... and I too enjoy visiting the Dublin blog.

Paula said...

It's a jump from the fountain to Grazcos, Julie. I really appreciate this gift of being able to distill, it's not as easy as it looks. I'm beginning to think the trick is making it look bland but detailed all at the same time. There's another blogger with this gift, Ubersee.

Frisky Librarian said...

I really like these photos. I've just recognised in myself a growing affection for parts of my city that are a little run down and grubby - construction sites, grotty laneways, that sort of thing. It's a nice counterbalance to the aesthetically pleasing shots. It's reality.

I also have recently started taking mroe notice of old, faded painted signs on buildings like your wool store shot. I love these little remnants of the past. Thanks for sharing.