Saturday, 16 January 2010

Weekend Reflection: cleaning up


This is the site of the second water supply for the new penal colony of Sydney, the first being the Tank Stream which is now encased in pipes underneath the skyscrapers of the CBD. This area is known as Lachlan Swamps after Governor Lachlan Macquarie. The trees you see are paperbarks, a variety of melaleuca. Paperbarks occur naturally in swamps and love moist, sandy conditions. Specifically, these paperbarks are the broad-leafed Melaleuca quinquenervia.

Lachlan Swamps served as Sydney’s main water supply for twenty years until 1859 when the area became irretrievably polluted. After much agitation and considerable heavy landscaping, Centennial Park was created in time for the centenary of settlement in 1888.


Lachlan Swamp contains a natural, underground spring. This spring water, which can still be seen bubbling to the top, is slightly acidic and therefore cleaner than other pondage in the park because iron pyrites present in the soil oxidises, releasing sulfur dioxide, a natural cleaning process. The water is also filtered up to the surface through sand contributing to its clearer appearance. So the dark brown of the surface water in these images is beneficial to the environment.

Information summarised from Centennial Parklands.

A member of the Weekend Reflection community.

47 comments:

Olivier said...

belle promenade en foret, les photos sont magnifiques, on s'enfonce dans la foret avec toi

brattcat said...

Talk about the forest primeval. These feel as if they could have been taken millions of years ago (except, of course, for that technology thing). Gorgeous images, Julie.

Lois said...

What beautiful pictures Julie! Such a lush area. The color of the water reminds me of some of the lakes and swamps around here that take on the color of tea from the cypress trees.

Catalina Lemus Fett said...

It usually happens that after much agitation in a swamp, then wrap abandoned. No longer does ... A pity but the scenery is beautiful. Being in the nature with its smells and noises.
I was delighted.

Greetings

BlossomFlowerGirl said...

Beautiful photos. They remind me of Lady Talbot Drive. I love going through forests.
Cheers.
Melbourne Daily Photo

Woody said...

The first two are very subtle reflections, but the last one is beautiful!

Diane AZ said...

I've never seen so many ferns growing in a natural area before, they're lovely and I like the loose tree bark too.

Regina said...

Refreshing!
Great reflections!

Nefertiti,deesse NiLuNoah adoratrice d Aton said...

great photos, a true paradise

my photo this is a photo taken of al Abbaye Orval in Belgium,Julie

Good weekend

RuneE said...

I see I have to update my knowledge about Australia. These fascinating photos and the information are a good start.

Thom said...

OMG these are just perfect. The last one is my total favorite. All I think of is how serene it must be. Well done. Have a wonderful weekend :)

Maia said...

These are very beautiful forest scenes Julie and interesting description. I've never seen such paperbarks. The reflections are gorgeous and I like the sun rays coming through.

Rebecca said...

This looks like such a beautiful spot with an interesting history. I love the last shot leading you into the reflection of the grasses in the light. Paper barks are interesting trees, I didn't know they were moisture loving.

Icy BC said...

The light and shade in your photos are amazing, and the fern are so plenty! So beautiful!

Malyss said...

This forest is so impressive.. strange, unusual..and the light is so special... All that makes a very interesting mood!

Vera said...

Lovely 'quiet' photos, capturing the beauty and strength of nature.

toledonative said...

Wow! Gorgeous! And just what I needed on this very gray and drizzly day. Green...I'd almost forgotten what it looked like! What a beautiful place - thank you so much for sharing it! (And the science teacher side of me says thanks for including all the sciency bits!)

cara said...

What a font of information you are. Excellent info, beautiful shots.

Pat and Bruce Caspersonn said...

Gorgeous stuff, as usual, I love it. Are you up every night at mid-night to thrill us each day?

Julie said...

*grin*
Close Bruce. I do this as a "job" which dovetails nicely with my research and my writing.

awarewriter said...

Your chisel was sharp when you crafted these images Julie. They're outstanding.

Vicki said...

Love the sense of tranquility you've captured in these photos. This is my sort of place, a place where the rest of the world ceases to exist. A place to escape...

Stine in Ontario said...

I would really enjoy exploring that swamp. (Truth is, many years ago I played in a swamp...but don't tell my mom.)

What a shame about the pollution! But I guess people didn't know a century and a half ago that water would one day be so valuable.

J Bar said...

Great shots. It looks like a place far away in the bush rather than a park so close to the city.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Serendipity said...

I really like these subtle reflections. Lovely!

Thérèse said...

I like reading these explications which bring texture to the images.
You seem to have your own "flat iron" in Sidney!

In Three Rivers, Michigan said...

No planned garden could be half as lovely as this melaleuca and fern forest, and the first shot with the light so perfect is just wonderful.
Three Rivers Daily Photo

jabblog said...

Beautiful, tranquil scene.

Bill said...

This is an amazing park, so close to the City. Nice photos.

VP said...

Beautiful images of a fascinating place. Something good is going on here, nature is healing itself.

Joan Elizabeth said...

These are lovely lovely shots ... the light is just perfect. It's fascinating to see how different the vegetaion is to my neck of the woods. A paperbark forest as captured by you is a delightsome thing even if I do feel mozzies biting.

Eden said...

Beautiful series of pictures, Julie. I haven't visited Centennial park yet.I hope one day.

About my reflection entry, that was taken in Nurragingy Reserve in Doonside, Blacktown. It is about 5 minutes from where we live.

thank you for the visit.

Lucy Corrander said...

Another world from mine!

Apart from the very interesting text and the beauty of the pictures, I find my eye fscinated by the way the stream, the light and the path point in different directions.

Lucy

KaHolly said...

Absolutely gorgeous. I half expected to see Robin Hood dart out from among the trees! Thanks for stopping by my blog and leaving a comment. Have a glorious day! ~karen

Erin said...

most interesting read and your photographs are fab. have a wonderful weekend.

AB said...

I like the first photo with all the exotic swampy trees in the background

mbkatc230 said...

What a beautiful series of photos Julie. Such a pristine area, hard to believe that it was once so polluted. What a lovely, serene place. Thanks for sharing these (and the interesting history too) Kathy

Gattina said...

What a beautiful place ! looks like a jungle !

Ebie said...

Its a beautiful swamp! Love the lush greenery and the reflection shots have a calming effect.

Enjoy your weekend Julie!

eileeninmd said...

What a beautiful place, lovely reflections.

happilyretired said...

Beautiful photos of this area in transition ... lovely reflections.
Hugs and blessings,

Helena said...

Beautiful photos and reflections! I appreciate the history lesson too. :)

cieldequimper said...

Fantastic post Julie. The third photo is stunning.

Re. my post, yes it is in Versailles and re. the cathedral post: the door is reflected in a shop window!

Have a wonderful Sunday.

cieldequimper said...

Make that Sunday evening!

ρομπερτ said...

Green - the colour of hope, still able to grow strong.

Please have a nice Sunday.

Tulsa Gentleman said...

Sue and I just returned from a nice little getaway and I am catching up. Your swamp is beautiful.

Unknown Mami said...

Fascinating. The pictures are stunning, but I would have no idea what I was truly looking at without your explanation.