Monday, 5 July 2010

Large birds of the Kimberleys


This is known across Australia as a Jabiru. However, we have to change the name to a Black-necked Stork as there is another bird in South America somewhere called a Jabiru. However, if that neck is black then I am full-forward for The Dogs! That yellow eye indicates a female.


A Whistling Kite 'befriended' us as we lunched beside the Victoria River half-way between Kununurra and Katherine. We saw these everywhere, they are very graceful as they soar effortlessly on the updrafts.


A pair of Brolgas fished silently in Windjana Gorge out from Derby where the Lennard River cuts through the limestone cliffs. A Brolga is a very large crane with an elaborate courting dance.


I got confused with this bird which I saw frequently. The rangers called it a Darter (and my bible indicates this to be a female Darter). However, the average joe called it a Shag which I gather is a form of Cormorant. They dive a lot and their feathers are not oiled so they have to dry them a lot.

Boo hoo ... did not capture a Wedgie all trip. Saw one flying high above Cooinda (on the Stuart Hwy just north of Katherine), but he was way way up. When I do shoot one, you will hear about it, rest assured!


A member of the Camera Critters community.

13 comments:

brattcat said...

Quite a flock you've gathered for us on this Sunday.

J Bar said...

It's a beauty.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

paul said...

I always admire the rich Australian birdlife, and these are great shots! Especially the darter.

What's a wedgie?

Julie said...

Sorry, Paul. A 'wedgie' is a Wedge-tailed Eagle, regarded as the king of Australian birdlife.

Joan Elizabeth said...

I've been chasing the wedge-tailed Eagles too and no success yet either. I was impressed with the kite. Most jealous however of the Brolgas. I want to see them one day dancing. There is a nice sculpture of Brolgas down at Darling Harbour (Cockle Bay)

Ann said...

Ditto the wedgie - one day. Your other shots are much better than I've managed, although I didn't have the long lens at time, from memory. I just assumed that the two jabirus were the same species of bird. They look pretty similar. How dare they make us change the name.

I'm going to Lake Eyre with Tri State out of Broken Hill. Expensive but they all are and they look good. Who are you going to Cape York with, that's one that's on my list.

Ann said...

I'm pretty sure this is the South American version (taken in Bolivia) I might have a shot of the African one as well but its film not digital.

http://travel.webshots.com/photo/2983499290082153280ODqFbr

Julie said...

Interesting, isn't it, that they are so similar but from different 'lines'. Looking at the derivation of the South American word, they would appear to have the greater claim to the word Jabiru. However, to replace it with 'black-necked stork' is so so ... pedestrian.

I reckon it will taken a couple of generations to eliminate the use of the word in the Australian context.

Matty said...

Gosh, they're all very beautiful. You capture some great shots.

diane said...

The bird life up there is staggering. Great shots especially the one in flight.

altadenahiker said...

I'd dry my wings a lot too if I had feathers like that. Gorgeous.

Clytie said...

Gorgeous!

TheChieftess said...

Cool shot...love the wingspread...