Tuesday, 14 September 2010

Hobartville - the carriage shed


Hobartville is a privately owned working stud. Owned by William Cox (the son of the famous road-builder) from 1816, the house shown yesterday was designed and supervised by Francis Greenway from 1827. In 1877 the property was purchased by Andrew Town and Australia's first yearling sales commenced. This fine example of a carriage shed is undated.

On Thursday, the fertile valley and tethering the convicts.

A member of the My World Tuesday community.

28 comments:

magicpolaroid said...

interesting post and photos!

Kay L. Davies said...

Very interesting Australian history, Julie. History from an architectural point of view, great idea.

Kay
Alberta, Canada

Strawberry Jam Anne said...

I love all your photos of this interesting looking building.

Francisca said...

A stunning series of photos of this carriage shed. Brick is such a warm material, the shape of the shed is unique, and it has amazing details - like that arched window - for what I'd think would be a utilitarian building. I like how you laid this out, Julie.

Miguel Martinez said...

Preciosas fotografias .
Un saludo.

J Bar said...

Wonderful building, gardens and great history.

paul said...

What depth of history, with great illustrations. You coped very well with some very harshly lit scenes in this post.

Jayne said...

See, if that were built today the architect would claim 'minimalism' and throw up a brick box with no redeeming features like that half-circle fanlight or the brick pillars at the corners and doorways, absolutely lovely!

Bill said...

A lot of history here. Great photos again.

brattcat said...

Excellent, Julie.

Indrani said...

The place seems to be echoing with many stories. Great pics.

Larry D said...

Very neat place, great photos!

Brit Gal Sarah said...

What a wonderful old building, what a history it must have and great pics.

Lesley said...

I really enjoyed reading this bit of history. I enjoy following an architect and seeing the transformation of an area through his works.

Catalina Lemus Fett said...

Debe ser una tranquilidad vivir en ese lugar. Lleno de historias y de vidas que estuvieron allí.
Me ha encantado ese collage que has hecho, interesante.

Saludos.

Bruce Caspersonn said...

That would be good to have in my backyard.

Julie said...

It must be a tranquillity to live in that place. Plenty of histories and lives that were there. I am enchanted by the collage you have done, interesting. Greetings.

Thank you Catalina Lemus Fett.

sweatha said...

Easy 1...2...3. Read and write your own article. A new collabrative dimension - www.jeejix.com

BraCom (Bram) said...

Thank you for sharing these wonderful old building pictures

Have a nice week,
Greetings, Bram

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Marie said...

Hi Julie. Thanks for your comment. This is an extraordinary post with an awesome building. Just love it. Thanks for sharing.

diane said...

A magic piece of history and dramatic shots of it.

Evelyn said...

It's got so much character.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Oooo I would like to go there. The lighting was bit 'shadowy' though so I can't see it quite as well as I would like. Love the yellow hedge and the flowery shrubs.

Carver said...

Very interesting post and beautiful photographs of the carriage shed.

Luna Miranda said...

the brick shed is splendid! your photos are beautiful--the lighting is superb.

nprimopiano said...

really great pictures. I love the large one with the leaning tree....

Ann said...

They keep race horses here? Such a coincidence that I was telling my adult ESOL students about the Melbourne cup.

Stephen Lindsay said...

I was fortunate to live at this property in the 1970s when it was owned by my family