Friday, 7 January 2011

Boom boom ...


This boom boat is displayed in the Naval Heritage Museum on Garden Island.

On the last day of May 1942, it was rowed by James Cargill and William Nagle as they went about their job of ensuring that the boom and net that stretched across the inner harbour was intact. Midget Japanese Submarines were known to be targetting Sydney Harbour.

At 9:51pm it was confirmed that the 'object' sighted 90 minutes earlier was, indeed, a midget sub, but before it could be attacked, the two Japanese submariners, blew their vessel to kingdom come.

I wanted to show you where the Boom was located but Google Map only gave me an option of Car or Foot, when I wanted to row! The boom and net went across the water from A to B. The sub was trapped close to B.



The two Japanese submariners were Lt Kenshi Chuman and Petty Officer Taeshi Omori.

12 comments:

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Wonderful story, Julie, and being a "map girl" the map gave a definite perspective on the events. Hummmm... a rowing option on Googlemaps... that's a great idea!

xx
Genie

Kay L. Davies said...

I agree, I can relate to the map.
So those two young men blew themselves up with the submarine? I'll never understand that.
As for a water option on Google maps, I think it would be great.
Great post, Julie.
-- K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

J Bar said...

Fascinating.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

Joan Elizabeth said...

Your history stories are always welcome. I love the platted rope work on the boom. A bit like a macrame project.

I agree regarding the blackbird ,,, it was just the shape didn't seem right.

J Bar said...

Julie, I always use my trusted UBD Street Directory when I'm preparing my posts and often discover names of bays and points that I didn't know existed because they aren't commonly used. I do use the Geographical Names Board site too but mainly to check whether the place names are still officially recognised or haven't been changed recently.

Mark Bellamy said...

Good morning Julie.
A very interesting post. I didn't know that this boat existed.
Have you ever seen the following site. The animations on the attack are really interesting

http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/underattack/sydharbour.html

Mark

Ann said...

So that's what it was. Wasn't in the mood for reading the plaques yesterday. Was good to catch up.

Peter said...

A good story -one that I have not heard, they must have been dark days.

Mary Ann said...

Nautical things have a curious beauty to them, even when they're attached to sad stories. . . .

bettyl said...

What an interesting post. Thanks for sharing such cool information.

JM said...

What a fantastic composition and great informative post!

Julie said...

Thank you friends. I appreciate both your visit and you time in commenting.