Tuesday, 31 May 2011

Refuge


Battered during a period of intense off-shore lows, these entry-ways are alternate entrances to St Andrews, one of two Christian cathedrals in the city centre. Mostly, the leaves have fallen from Liquidamber trees, once freely planted by local councils, but more recently regarded as 'noxious'.

Left: 1840s Right: 1860s
The original foundation stone for this cathedral was laid in 1837 using the plans of one architect, although it was consecrated in 1867 after being supervised by another architect, Edmund Blackett who was very active in the city in the middle of the 19th century. This central part of the city, bounded by George, Druitt, Kent and Bathurst Streets was the site of the first colonial cemetery shown in the two old images from the City of Sydney site.

14 comments:

Thérèse said...

Only 30 years for the construction of this cathedral! Can we say gothic about the style?

Kay L. Davies said...

Beautiful photos of a lovely place, Julie. Now I have to look up those trees that are now considered noxious.
— K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

freefalling said...

You DID cop a battering yesterday!!
Did you see those awesome water spouts off the beaches yesterday?

Julie said...

Letty - I think more is to come today. I caught a glimpse of the spouts, but was a bit preoccupied. Shall email later this morning.

Genie -- Paris and Beyond said...

Beautiful autumn shots, Julie... Do tell, do you just get down on the ground for these photo angles? I am impressed!

Bises,
Genie

Julie said...

Therese - Gothic Revival style, I believe.

Kay - the LA is regarded by many councils as 'noxious' because of its root system when planted on footpaths. Although a member of the gum family, it is exotic to our landscape.

Genie - *grin* for the photo of the door, I was at the bottom of a set of steps which gave a natural perspective. For the tree, yes, I had to get down on my knees, in the rain, and the mud. I believe it is called devotion.

J Bar said...

An interesting view of it.
Sydney - City and Suburbs

diane b said...

Great Autumn shots and I'm impressed with you getting down and getting dirty to take them. They look awfully fat trees to be Liquid Amber.

Julie said...

Diane - I think the closest trunk is that of a LA, but not the further away one. I will have a definitive look when I am in there again tomorrow.

Joan Elizabeth said...

I was extremely interested in your take on a loved location -- St Andrew's being my city church home. I love the sense of anticipation walking up those steps while the bells are chiming.

But the trees got me. The jacaranda always gets my attention and there are plane trees in the square but I don't think I have noticed a Liquid Amber.

The reason why councils don't like them is because they have very vigorous roots which sprout more trees wherever they break the surface which can be a huge distance from the mother tree. They crack concrete etc ... not a nice prospect in the city and suburbs. We have one down the back and it has spawned at least 5 new trees.

Julie said...

Ah ... I was waiting for your comment, as I knew you would have knowledge. I nearly took another shot from the college entry but it was raining too hard. Your comment about the Jacarandah reminds me of where I put other shots of St Andrews - in my Purple Sydney folder. I will research the Sydney Square tree plantings tomorrow and report back on Thursday or Friday.

brattcat said...

Love the perspective you're working from in these.

Alan O'Riordan said...

Like Genie and Diane, I'm mightily impressed with your dedication to your photography! Not forgetting your research and sourcing of the older images. Bravo!

Thérèse said...

Thks Julie...