Thursday, 23 June 2011

A sacred quiet


There can be oases of quiet within a bustling metropolis. Such a cliche that: bustling metropolis. With its shades of Superman.

They were not supermen, these boys who went eagerly to fight on foreign shores, at the behest of foreign generals. They were boys. Inexperienced in the ways of the world. Fodder for the ambitions of other nation states. As are the boys of today.


But at least we keep their memory sacred. In a mausoleum, redolent of the times. A simple building, for a simple people, from simpler times. When lines in sands were more obvious.

Hyde Park South is a sobering part of a bustling metropolis. But, reflective of a national trait, we sit on its steps, eating white-bread cheese sandwiches unwrapped from grease-proof paper, our bicycle clips around the cuffs of our unpressed jeans. Eyes scanning the horizon for the approaching dark storm clouds from the sou-west.

20 comments:

Paul said...

It may have happened a long time ago, but you are right we should never forget. My grandfather was an Irishman who went of to a foreign field and was at Passchendaele alongside many Australians. Whilst he never really talked about the war he held the ANZAC soldiers in high regard.

DeeBee L. said...

Very inspiring text!
Greetings, DeeBee

Rae Walter said...

Beautiful photographs and sobering words. Thanks Julie.

Kay L. Davies said...

The statue is beautiful, Julie. Your photo of the arm on the sword is exquisite.
My father was in WWII, his father in WWI. I can never forget.
— K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Beautiful post Julie, makes you think..

Ann said...

Impressive and moving sculpture, that one.

J Bar said...

That really is a powerful sculpture inside. I had never really noticed it until it had been featured by Sydney bloggers recently.

Dina said...

A very moving post this is.

Rinkly Rimes said...

The extended arm is a work of art by itself. Let us hope that, one day, there is no need for such memorials.

Joe said...

The sculpture is magnificent. It appears so fluid. Great photos accompanied by wonderful text. Thank you.

lizziviggi said...

You have painted a picture with words... and made me crave a cheese sandwich.

I love the elegant simplicity of the photo of the draping hand.

Peter said...

We, the Dutch, have to be thankfull for all you did for us during WW2.
The statue by Rayner Hoff called Sacrifice is magnificient, same goes for the monument in Hyde Park.

Madge said...

Your image of the extended arm is very dramatic.. thank you to veterans who gave so much... 'All gave some, some gave all.'

Margaret said...

Very nice photos, Julie!

Kevin said...

A beautiful tribute in words and images.

Julie said...

Thank you, friends. This place is a challenge to see afresh.

JM said...

The hand and the top compositions are outstanding! I truly love these two images, Julie. Great job.

I have never seen aluminiun flaps on drums either. They make a subtle sound, a kind of cascabel, I guess.

IWASNTBLOGGEDYESTERDAY said...

beautiful, my son marched out of Kapooka yesterday,so these images are very stirring.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Yes that sculpture and the way you have singled out the hand is quite special.

Julie said...

It is a very artistic building, Joan. An oasis ...