Tuesday, 4 October 2011

Dormitory of the Dead


There was a time I would not countenance this. 'Ashes to ashes' is good and well. But, let them be scattered to the four corners. What cannot be brought to memory, is well left to eternity.

So many once-people rest here, with nary a visitor. Nary a soft word, nor tender touch on the sandstone. Chiselled words erased by the passage of time, if they were there to begin with. Perhaps an unmarked grave. I walk the row, weaving my still warm body through the dormitory.

14 comments:

Jeff said...

Beautiful words. Is that your own writing?

Kay L. Davies said...

Wonderful, Julie, ever so very well said.

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie’s Guide to Adventurous Travel

Julie said...

Yes, Jeff. Thank you.

Vicki said...

Beautiful photography and writing, Julie. Evocative and lyrical.

Ann said...

I went to Christchurch's biggest cemetery and saw the earthquake destroy some of the graves.

J Bar said...

Interesting contrast to yesterday's post.

Joe said...

My goodness. You make me gasp with the originality of your words.

Julie said...

*blush*

Joan Elizabeth said...

It takes just one or two generations to pass for people to be forgotten. That is why I like the gravestones ... it brings family back to life. I remember the thrill of finding my great-great-great grandfather's grave in Moruya. I wonder how many other descendants have also discovered that weathered headstone and acknowledged kinship.

Julie said...

Joan - We are about to do that in our family. A 'clan of cousins' is gathering in Jamieson (Vic) at the end of November, when residents celebrate their 150th. I am hoping to prove that my GG grandfather is in Plot 6 in Jamieson Cemetery. I feel assured that I can do this. The plot is currently unmarked, but I hope to rectify that, too.

brattcat said...

simply exquisite post, julie.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Another great post Julie, your words have made me even more determined not to let that happen with my Mum and Dad, Dad's ashes have already been scattered in Scotland and Mum's will follow soon, but they have plaques in Pinnaroo Valley Cemetery which is so beautiful, Aimee and I often include this as part of our walks and sit on a bench nearby even if it's just for a few minutes,and just remember.

Halcyon said...

I must say, I love visiting cemeteries. This one is quite different from what you usually find here in North America. I like it though. And your words are haunting.

Gemma Wiseman said...

Perhaps gravestones may not really mark some enigmatic passage to eternal life, but they do connect generations of families if they wish to take the time to make connections! A great post!