Thursday, 14 June 2012

Tobacco road


Tobacco growing in the King Valley and Myrtleford areas of Victoria is all but extinct - as it should be. However, numerous drying kilns dot the landscape as reminders of how farmers in the area diversified between the wars, and with the influx of European immigrants during the 1950s.

The architecture is intruiging. These examples are to be found at Pizzini's Vineyard in Whitfield.

10 comments:

Kay L. Davies said...

I guess the tobacco farmers were the only victims of the world's quit-smoking campaign. The tobacco kilns are somehow reminiscent of both fish-packing plants and grain elevators — basic, built-to-purpose architecture of farm and sea coast.
K

Julie said...

Kay, the remind me of grain elevators to some extent. There are some variations of the design to allow for the smoke to escape the top and suck it all through. Yes, tobacco growers and poppy growers ... but I think the wider community needs to pay to eradicate some agriculture.

Carole M. said...

another sign from yesteryear; thanks for sharing Julie

Ann said...

Look at all that corrugate. I can see why they remind you of grain elevators.

Jim said...

You don't see that much corrugated iron these days.

Joan Elizabeth said...

Ah ... enough CI to delight over and over again. I must admit to not knowing anything about this crop.

Peter said...

Very unusual architecture, never thought I say it but there is beauty in tobacco.

Rae Walter said...

Looks lik e great place to be with a camera Julie. Lucky you.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

They reminded me of the tobacco drying sheds we saw when we were schoolkids in Rhodesia Julie, I bet they're still going strong.

George said...

I think that's a good place to get photos for the sight is really different. Seems really interesting.
Cheap Flights