Monday, 3 September 2012

Hearing the silent scream


This is Faye. You met here on Saturday, during the Theme Day excitement. Faye lives with dementia. Mostly, when I am there, Faye sits in a comfortable chair looking after her baby. But on Friday, during the soft exercise period, she paid attention. She caught and threw the ball. She had a conversation with me, insisting that I sit down instead of her, because I walk with a stick. This is a facility where the psycho-social is more important than the merely medical.

14 comments:

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

That was good of her to let you sit - thanks for sharing

Robert Geiss said...

Deep bow in respect. Sorry for not finding other words.

Peter said...

A touching portrait.

Joan Elizabeth said...

I loved my dolls. If I ever have the misfortunate of being a dementia unit I hope they give me a doll too.

Julie said...

Two of the women have dolls , which they take with them everywhere. They are referred to as 'baby' by all the staff. They have a fish tank now, but I would also like to see them get a cat. I have introduced you to the dog who visits regularly with a relative. However, that is not likely to last past Christmas.

diane b said...

I believe the doll/baby gives the patient a sense of being needed and a worthwhile person. It takes them back to the days of when they were important to someone. I was asked to take a doll for my Mum but she didn't bother with it very much.
I much rather like the idea of them having a dog to look after and befriend.

Joe said...

It must be so difficult to hav a relative in this position. I guess we learn to cope with everything life throws at us.

Theanne said...

the odds are very good that someday...soon...I'll know what goes on in her mind. only I won't know I know.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Julie these portraits and stories are incredibly touching. My Mum and Dad both passed very quickly, I'm not sure what would be worse, as in our case the shock of not getting 'used' (I'm sure you know what I mean)to the idea, or to see them slipping slowly away like this but selfishly still having them physically there.

Lois said...

Oh Julie, these are portraits are so sad, yet beautiful at the same time. Thanks for sharing.

Kay L. Davies said...

So many memories here, Julie. I still miss my parents, who both died in a care facility.
Beautiful photos.
K

LOLfromPasa said...

What a kind heart you have, Julie. These are wonderful portraits.

Julie said...

Thank you, folks. I enjoy talking and feeling with older people who dont get to relate much with people other than nurses. It is not so much a kind heart, really. Although, I have noticed that most people rear back and only approach their own relative.

AL said...

I can relate to this as I work in health and see this a lot of the time, event hough I am not in this area of nursing. On a personal note my mother has dementia and dealing with her degrees of memory is so frustrating and sad. Great portraits julie.