Sunday, 14 June 2009

Hands


No guesses required today: these are the hands of Julia Gillard, Deputy PM of Australia. I tried to shoot the massive ring on her left hand, but it eluded me.

My guess is that she - possibly a naturally touchy-feely person - has been trained to keep her hands behind her back to stop her flinging them around as she speaks and to stop her reaching out to touch people. She slipped only once, when she put her hand on the shoulder of a young student.

7 comments:

Joan Elizabeth said...

Interesting your speculation as to why she keeps her hands behind her back. Do you think she likewise has a high pitched voice which she is trying to make lower ... it's irritating. Perhaps she should allow her natural self run.

brattcat said...

I love this series of hands, Julie. They tell a deep story, they reveal far more than the PM would care to show, I think. So eloquently told with your lens. Beautiful.

AB said...

This is a fascinating side to a public figure.

Julie said...

JE: I am not sure that any politician is advantaged by letting their natural self run: the electorate would cut them down. I think it is important that she control her hands as just touching a student leaves one open to a charge of abuse and worse. As for the voice thing: I quite like her voice and would hate for her to Londonise the accent. Many of our politicians have/had unique vocal qualities, eg Howard had to contend with his deafness, and Hawke had a stridently Oz twang. Rudd has a more irritating delivery than Julia, IMHO.

Ann said...

She's obviously done some work in her time, makes her come across as even more down to earth. I like the woman, she's got a lot going for her.

Jacob said...

These photos are a strong reminder of the truth in the old saying that "Pictures speak louder than words!"

Superb!

Hilary said...

Stunning photos Julie - didn't know which to comment on - all so interesting and vivid.
I'm afraid I don't know this politician but she seems to be making a strong impression. I thought the hands belonged to an older person. You never can tell.