Thursday, 4 August 2011

The responsibility of exclusivity


There are four main thoroughfares that comprise Centennial Park, the suburb. They are Lang Road, Martin Road, Robertson Road, and Cook Road. Of these Martin Road is the only one that has not segued into a major thoroughfare around the Sydney Cricket Ground and associated sporting facilities. Of course, this meant that it retained its 'exclusive' air.

Although the type of material used to construct the housing was mandated (to exclude the hoi-poloi) the style of building was not prescribed. Hence, along these four thoroughfares can be seen styles such as Federation, Arts & Crafts, Victorian, Old English, and Californian Bungalow. Being a member of the hoi-poloi, the thing that strikes me the most is the size of the blocks, the hedges to keep out prying eyes, and the landscaped gardens.

Having large houses of a specific style which are registered on the National Estate (its heirs and successors forever!), means a hefty annual bill for maintenance. Some of the houses are starting to look tawdry as a result.

14 comments:

Kay L. Davies said...

Look at all those hedges, row upon row, almost like a maze (or is it?). I hope there's a driveway in back because the owners of these houses must get old just like the rest of us, money or no.
Beautiful, though, I must admit. I wouldn't mind sitting on that balcony, looking down at all those hedges being trimmed by someone other than myownself. I'm still aching from trimming my honeysuckle last night, giving the back yard arch another few days of life while I search the shed for the other arch-to-assemble I bought at the same time.
Yes, I'm getting more energy. Will be in Russia in a week. Meanwhile, I'm so proud of your indomitable daughter. She is amazing!
Hugs to Alannah.
Luv, K

cara said...

I have funny images of you peeping round walls and over hedges with your camera getting these shots. I'm a big fan of that letter box.

Julie said...

Yes, I am a fan of the letter box, but am perplexed by the 'taste' of the person who applied the lead lining!!

brattcat said...

Tawdry is hardly the adjective I'd use to describe this place. Sorry about the mix-up yesterday...thanks to Kay for clearing things up. Sending a big enough hug to encompass your entire remarkable family.

freefalling said...

I don't think I even knew about Centennial Park til I read Patrick White: A Life and it spoke so much of his home in that area.
Are you gunna show us his house?

I don't mind the odd "bit of tawdry" every now and then.

Peter said...

Love these grand old mansions, long may they stand.

Julie said...

He lived in Martin Road. I am back over that way for my early morning walk tomorrow.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Is 'tawdry. along the same lines as 'shabby chic' Julie? Really looking forward to seeing more of the houses in this street. Take care.

Joe said...

Very regal entry point for letters. If these estates are moving towards "tawdry" how long before the become part of the hoi-poloi?

Kate said...

I'm not a fan of this landscaping; it seems entirely too busy. I'd rather have a sweep of lawn leading down from the house.

Reading your son-in-law's posts every day now. Hugs for all of you.

Joan Elizabeth said...

I like the colours in the top shot. The colours and the patchwork lead remind me of a quilt I made once. The garden down the bottom with all those clipped hedges looks like hard work to me.

diane b said...

Still nice to see it retained as a reminder of the hoi paloy of yester year.

JM said...

If I was shown the detail shot above without knowing who the photographer was, I think I would immediatly think of you. I just love it, the colours are amazing!

Julie said...

*grin* Thank you, Jose. I find details tell a story so much more personally than the larger landscape. I am glad it gives you pleasure.