Wednesday, 10 April 2013

Of cabbages and kings



Conceits, of course, can be taken too far, so far that the elasticity afforded the concept snaps, and what was vision, is mere elitism.

Burley Griffin took his remembrance of Edinburgh Castle, and the rock upon which it stood, and filtered it through the development of his ideal suburb. Streets were designed and planned to follow the contour lines, with foreshores preserved for public access. This can clearly be seen when looking at a street map. However, the geekiest thing that WBG and his wife, Marion Mahoney Griffin [MMG] did was to name these streets after prominent features of castles.

A 'Sortie Port' is the same as a 'Sally Port'. Armed men go out on 'sorties', yes? Indeed, they 'sally' forth.

So let me acknowledge Griffin's conceit, and match him: "And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the powers of death shall not prevail against it." [Matthew 16:18].

Surely not ... let's bring it all crashing down, with this little beauty, snapped just two streets away.

7 comments:

Jim said...

Quite interesting.

Jo said...

love having you back....
also all the streets in Manyana where we holiday have all those street names too.

Joe said...

Fantastic post Julie. Love the way elitism comes crashing down in just two images.

Julie Storry said...

Thanks for your interest, folks. I am still evolving a style and voice for this new area, so am pleased that you are bearing with me.

I looked at Manyana on Google, Jo, and the names are very similar. I wonder what reasons there were for Manyana to be naming its streets after parts of a castle.

Jo said...

sand castles maybe?

Joan Elizabeth said...

Did you feel tempted to try that swing?

Julie Storry said...

*chuckle* , Jo

Not at all Joan. Although I have made use of the image, it is a very sterile image, as though there for show. Beneath, the grass is still perfect rather than scuffed by marauding feet, and the branch does not look all that strong. A Jacaranda from memory ... however, the image still speaks of freedom and childhood, nomatter ...