Saturday, 18 May 2013

Old Man Banksia [banksia serrata]


Looking like a repository of the wisdom of the ages, this Banksia serrata overlooks The Haven Amphitheatre, the Scarp, Castlecrag. The entire gully is populated with fine examples of Australian bush plantings, like the tree ferns I showed yesterday, and the Angophora costata I showed the day before that.


And so the cycle that started with the Griffins in the late '20s and early '30s persists until this day. People choose to nestle their homes on the sides of gullies surrounded by the sights and sounds of the Australian bush. There are some things that would horrify the Griffins, but others that would delight them.


7 comments:

Chwile... said...

U was zaczyna się jesień, u nas bucha ożywcza wiosna. Tak to jest w naturze.

Julie said...

This translates something like:

At your place begins to fall, in our invigorating spring gushes. So it is in nature.

For which, I thank you.

Kay L. Davies said...

These are beautiful, Julie.
K

FigMince said...

For me, Julie, the real feature of banksias is the distinctive 'bush' smell of them. Not the flower spikes, but the trees themselves. And especially near a beach.

Joe said...

True survivors of nature Julie.

Julie said...

FM, I know the smell of bush, but thought that to be chased away by the smell of salt near the sea, not a creek though. What surprised me about this Banksia was the trunk and its bark. Obviously why it is called 'old man banksia' ...

Joan Elizabeth said...

I too love the bark of Banksia Serrata and its summer flowers but I love the hairpin banksia (the one in your other shot) because it flowers in Autumn when not much else is flowering in the bush. It will be interesting to see what you turn up in Spring.

I understand the need for your blog to venture further. I guess that is why I don't post quite as often in BMJ these days because this is only so much one can do with bush walks.